ice cream, people, Places

Selling ice cream (helado) by the Lake

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This wonderful happy man can be seen in the villlage of Chapala Mexico in the state of Jalisco.  On weekends you can pretty much always find him pushing his tomato red cart.  He sells ice cream, called helado in Spanish.   He has lots of flavors to make you happy.  The atmosphere is pleasant and the malecon (tiled walkway along the water’s edge) and the plaza are just lovely.  The lake is beautiful and cools the air. Right now there has been so much rain that the lake is the highest its been in 50 years.

You can stroll and eat and take in all the sights and sounds.  Very often you can find people dancing in the plaza to the music of local musicians.  Some of the bands will be a collection of guitars, drums, and various brasses including tubas.  Chapala is a great town.  Some may call it a city.  If it sounds like I am selling the place, I’m not really.  I just enjoy it.

In Mexico they churn the ice cream by hand, in huge metal canisters called garrafas. The canisters are filled with the ice cream base and placed inside of wooden barrels full of ice and salt, and then it’s someone’s job to stir the ice cream with a large wooden paddle as it slowly freezes.

This technique gives the ice cream a unique texture. “Mexican ice cream is closer to gelato, as it has less fat and air than American style,”

When I saw this guy, I was immediately attracted to the cart and his infectious smile.  I just had to paint him.  happy   happy   happy.

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If you are interested, click the picture to purchase a print or a textile of this watercolor.

Read more about making Ice Cream in Mexico here:
http://www.tastecooking.com/mexicanicecream

Ajijic, Places

Empty Church

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I first saw this unique building from a friend’s balcony high on the hill.  I knew it was something that needed to explore.  That was in August.  It is now January and I have since  moved to Ajijic. This was on my  ‘to do’ list and  this mysterious building turned into one of my first watercolors here.

My roommate and I figured we could get there by hiking down the steep and somewhat tricky footpath from our house.  We could see it pretty clearly from our azotea or rooftop.  That first hike was exciting and there were surprises along the way:  fresh sage bushes, small chickens and a small rooster as well as goats and their herder.  Like all things Ajijic, every step needed to be carefully taken.  Slippery rocks, water, mud and the like can be unfriendly.

When we reached the bottom of the hill, this wonderful building seemed to glow in the late afternoon sun.  It really was pink and yellow.  The building looked like it was never completed and even though a stone wall separated us, breaks in the wall showed us we could see it was empty.  The arches and three domes with their wooden crosses were signature markings.  So this is the second painting in this new series,  It’s very motivating to see new things to paint that intrigue and inspire.  This is identified as Capilla Vieja del Panteon Municipal De San Antonio, Tlayacapan.

This watercolor is available